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Canadian citizenship and immigration

Canadian citizenship and immigration announced. IC announces changes to strengthen employer accountability under the International Mobility Program.

Regulatory changes

The Government of Canada Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) announced regulatory changes that will come into effect on February 21, 2015. The changes will apply to employers of foreign workers who are exempt from the Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) process, as well as to foreign nationals applying for open work permits.

Employing foreign nationals

As of that date, employers hiring foreign nationals who are exempt from the Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) process will be required to submit information about their business or organization, the Offer of Employment form, and pay a fee to Citizenship and Immigration Canada. These requirements will need to be completed before the foreign national can apply for an employer-specific work permit under the International Mobility Program.

Employee compliance fee

The employer compliance fee has been set at CA$ 230 and must be paid online. The fees collected will offset the cost of introducing robust employer compliance activities featuring inspections of thousands of employers.

According to the CIC, when an inspection finds that an employer is non-compliant, the employer could face an administrative monetary penalty, a ban from hiring foreign workers and, in serious cases, a criminal investigation and prosecution. The adoption of this system will mean that all employers, whether they are hiring LMIA-exempt foreign nationals or temporary foreign workers through the LMIA process that has determined that there are no Canadians available for the job, will face the same level of scrutiny in their hiring and treatment of foreign workers. For more information, please click here.

Disclaimer: The above Canadian citizenship and immigration changes are provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

 

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